News

Harvard Gazette: LSC puts compassion into action

By Clea Simon.

Published by the Harvard Gazette on April 11, 2019.  Photos by Heratch Ekmekjian.

Legal Services Center Faculty Director Daniel Nagin speaks on a panel with LSC Tax Clinic Director Keith Fogg, Boston City Councilor Michelle Wu, Rep. Joseph Kennedy III, ArchCity Defenders Executive Director Blake Strode, and disability rights advocate Haben Girma.

“Reaching out to others is how you find out who you really are,” said Daniel Nagin, vice dean of experiential and clinical education and faculty director of the WilmerHale Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School (HLS). He was quoting the late HLS Professor Gary Bellow, LL.B. ’60, who in 1979 co-founded the Jamaica Plain center with his wife, senior lecturer in law Jeanne Charn, J.D. ’70. On April 5, Nagin and others celebrated the center’s 40th anniversary, and the quote strikes at the heart of the center’s mission of improving the legal profession through experiential learning while working with community organizations to enact real and lasting change.

Transformational change may be possible only through such a cooperative effort, said Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey ’92. Giving the keynote address at the celebration, she pointed out that not only have more than 40,000 people used the center’s services over the years — people “who were shown an opportunity to have a life-changing experience” — but also approximately 4,500 students have worked there. “Students who have learned to see life, experience life, through the circumstances of another,” she said.

The Legal Services Center — or, as Bellow has described it in the past, the “teaching law office” — is similar to the teaching hospital model used in medical schools across the country, including at Harvard, and it has helped change the lives of thousands of clients in Jamaica Plain, Roxbury, and other neighborhoods in Boston and beyond. Its programs address issues related to housing, domestic violence, predatory lending, and other community needs. The center offers clinics that specialize in areas including federal taxes, estate planning, and accessing veterans’ benefits. Its reach is broad and its results can often be life-changing.

During the 2017–18 academic year, HLS students provided pro bono legal assistance to more than 4,000 clients in Massachusetts, including more than 2,300 residents in the Boston area. The graduating class of 2018 contributed 376,532 hours of pro bono legal assistance, an average of 637 hours per student over their three years at the Law School. This is part of the effort to, in the words of HLS Dean John F. Manning, “make sure we’re always on the cutting edge of clinical education.”

The day’s events showed how this interaction can work. In the first of a series of roundtable discussions on how to narrow the gap between rich and poor and achieve justice for the most vulnerable, “#Connect: A Law Student and Client Discuss Collaboration” featured 2L student D Dangaran and a client recalling how they had worked together, under the guidance of Stephanie Davidson, J.D. ’13, a clinical instructor in the domestic violence and family law clinic. The client had been in the process of freeing herself from an abusive relationship when she met Dangaran, and had already obtained a temporary restraining order against her husband that allowed her and her children to stay in the family home. When Dangaran met her, the order was once again up for review — and her husband had already been arrested for violating it.

“My second week in the clinic and it was the biggest trial of the clinic,” recalled Dangaran. But the client was calm, assured by the student’s focus. “[Dangaran] already knew my case as if they’d been with us the entire time,” she said. “I was very comfortable, and it took a lot of my nerves away.”

Sameer Ashar, Vice Dean for Experiential Education and Professor of Law at UCLA School of Law; Luz Hererra, Professor of Law and Associate Dean for Experiential Education, Texas A&M University School of Law; Jeanne Charn; Sarah Boonin, Clinical Professor of Law and Associate Director of Clinical Programs, Suffolk University; Jeff Selbin, Clinical Professor of Law; Faculty Director, Policy Advocacy Clinic; and Co-Faculty Director of the Thelton E. Henderson Center for Social Justice, Berkeley Law

The preparation that went into the case paid off. The husband didn’t show for the hearing, and the client and Dangaran were called to the bench. The judge granted a permanent restraining order “before we even asked,” said Dangaran.

Charn, who was the center’s director for 28 years, served as the institutional memory for the next panel, “#Spark: The Influence of the Bellow-Charn Model on Legal Education.” The center’s beginning, she said, was rocky. “Almost no one supported what we were doing.”Committed to social justice, the center initially took students from several law schools and recruited experts from other institutions, such as MIT, to help them not only win cases but understand the underlying problems. If design could help a landlord maintain apartments, they would bring in designers, she said. “We were at ground level.”

The discussion then progressed to how the Bellow-Charn approach works. Moderator Sarah Boonin, J.D. ’04, now a professor at Suffolk University Law School, said the model was built on the idea that clinics should be immersed in the community they serve because “the community was also a teacher.” For Jeffrey Selbin, J.D. ’89, a professor at UC-Berkeley and director of its Policy Advocacy Clinic, the teaching element was immediately key. “When I walked to the center on my very first day, I was told, ‘You have a client in room one.’” The case involved Social Security benefits for a woman in her 50s. “She just looked at me and said, ‘You’ve never done this before.’ Then she said, ‘I’ve never done this before, either. It’ll be just fine,’ which was an early lesson in ‘client as teacher.’”

Martha Minow; Brandon German, community organizer; Nnena Odim, Director of LSC’s Family Law/Domestic Violence Clinic; Robert Greenwald, Faculty Director of the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation.

The next discussion, “#Uplift: Using the Law for Economic Justice,” began by asking what had inspired the panelists to make a career seeking economic justice. Rep. Joseph Kennedy III, J.D. ’09, shared his frustration as a Peace Corps volunteer unable to alleviate the grinding poverty of Haitian sugarcane cutters in the Dominican Republic. Haben Girma, J.D. ’13, who has limited vision and hearing, recounted being turned away from a summer job once her potential employer met her. Today, Girma, who was named White House Champion of Change by President Barack Obama, advocates for equal opportunities for people with disabilities.

For Blake Strode, J.D. ’15, the spark came even earlier. Strode, executive director of ArchCity Defenders, a nonprofit civil rights law firm in St. Louis, remembered a classmate in his elementary school, an immigrant from Cameroon, who was relentlessly teased for her poverty and accent until he finally gathered the courage to sit with her at lunch and speak up for her.

“It was my first experience of seeing what it meant to stand with someone as they are enduring injustice,” said Strode, who later in the day was presented with the Bellow-Charn Championship of Justice Emerging Leader Award.“That’s the role of the social justice lawyer,” he concluded, “to create community and stop that oncoming train.”

The Department of Education Is Still Trying to Take Students’ Tax Returns

The rights of more than 100,000 borrowers are affected by this court ruling.

Update, March 28, 2019:

Even after a federal judge told it to stop, the Department of Education is still trying to get away with stealing students’ tax refunds.

Five months ago, the court told the Department that it must stop using this aggressive collection method against Everest Massachusetts borrowers. However, the Department stubbornly has only recognized the court’s order as applying to the two named plaintiffs, and continued to seize the tax refunds of other students who are covered by the pending borrower defense claim filed by the Massachusetts Attorney General on behalf of all Everest Massachusetts borrowers.

Because the Department refuses to follow the court’s order in this case, AG Healey recently filed a motion to force the Department to comply with the court order and stop using tax refund offset to collect on any Everest students in Massachusetts. Yesterday, we submitted our own filing in support of that motion. The government opposed.

My Student Loan Truth: Kristina’s Virginia College Story

In our Student Loan Truth blog series, our clients share what they really got from their for-profit college and how the debt affected them. Their experiences demand a public reckoning on student debt and an end to the predatory practices of for-profit colleges.

This is Kristina’s student loan truth.Virginia College Student

“I was focused. I had goals.”

When Kristina Jefferson enrolled in the cosmetology program at Virginia College last year, she thought she would have been proudly walking across the stage at her graduation with her cosmetology certificate this month, and prepared to take her cosmetology licensure examination, but the school failed her. Virginia College’s abrupt shutdown last year was just one of many instances where the school failed her and the rest of its students.

Thousands of students like Kristina have been left with no school, no education, and tens of thousands of dollars in debt by Virginia College and other schools owned by its parent company, Education Corporation of America.

If you were a student at Virginia College, Brightwood College, Brightwood Career Institute, Ecotech Institute, Golf Academy of America, or New England College of Business, click on this link to find out more information about the status of the schools and how you may be able to file a claim for a refund if the school has any assets left.

 

How did you hear about Virginia College?

Virginia College had a lot of commercials with people explaining their life struggles and how the school helped them. There was one commercial with a Black woman riding the bus that stuck out to me. She was homeless, and she had two children. She decided to go to school for Medical Assisting, and it bettered her life. After attending Virginia College, she got a job, her life improved, and she had more stability. She didn’t have to ride the bus anymore. I understood her struggle because I relied heavily on the bus for transportation, and I, too, wanted to better my life.

That was in 2014; I decided to go to Virginia College for Medical Assisting because I wanted to care for people. I know how it feels to be sick. I am a good listener. I wanted to help lift people’s spirits.

They never helped me get a job in the medical field. But I had taught myself how to do hair and had been doing it for years, so in 2018 I decided I wanted to hone my skills and get licensed. I had seen a lot of online advertisements on Facebook and I took it as a sign that I should do the cosmetology program, so I enrolled last year.

 

What did they tell you about the programs and getting a job when you started?

Both times they said we were guaranteed to get a job after we finished the program. It was not true, and all they did was send links of jobs from Indeed. I was living with my mother and was not financially independent. I had to take the bus which required me to wake up at 4am to get to school on time; I even had to walk on the highway. The school promised me that they would help me get a job and help me get an easier commute, but they did nothing.

 

Describe the educational experience at Virginia College.

We had to teach ourselves. The instructors didn’t want to help us understand or answer questions. For the cosmetology program, they only taught by showing us videos. The instructors also didn’t teach us certain skills they said they would. We were supposed to learn how to do makeup, but instead, the instructor gave us a paper printout with a face and we used colored pencils, our own makeup, or the school’s outdated makeup to color in the face.

They promised we would get jobs, help with our resumes, they would teach us, and that our credits were transferable. They didn’t keep any of those promises. They didn’t even keep the school open!

 

How did you get your student loans?

When enrolling I met with the financial aid people, but they didn’t explain anything to me. I didn’t know the amount of loans the school was borrowing on my account. They told me everything would be covered by student loans, but toward the end of my time at Virginia College, I was told I had a balance and wouldn’t be able to receive my certificate if I didn’t pay the balance. That’s on top of the more than $30,000 in federal loans I have because of them.

 

What impact has Virginia College and this debt had on your life?

They really ruined my life, and it’s not right. I had goals. The school closing just made it harder for me. I have to start all over now. I was told that my credits were transferable, but it’s not true. Basically, my transcript is worthless. It’s just a bunch of words. It’s not right.

 

Some policy-makers doubt that for-profit colleges are a problem – what would you say to them?

It is a problem when they are just trying to make money and don’t care about the students. Virginia College closed down and people are suffering. It is not right. They took our money and then closed and left the students to try to fix what they caused.

 

The Department of Education has refused to cancel the loans of thousands of former students of for-profit colleges. What would you say to the Department about the need to cancel these loans?

They need to be more understanding of situations like this and protect the students. It’s not right.

 

Sound familiar? Do you have a similar story to Kristina’s at Virginia College, Brightwood College, Brightwood Career Institute, Ecotech Institute, Golf Academy of America, or New England College of Business? Click on this link to find out more information about the status of the schools and how you may be able to file a claim for a refund if the school has any assets left.

Despite Court Order in it’s Favor, the Project on Predatory Student Lending Continues to Wait for DOJ to Produce Documents

Nearly three years after submitting its original Freedom of Information Act (“FOIA”) request, the Project on Predatory Student Lending is still waiting for the Department of Justice (“DOJ”) to fulfill its legal obligations to produce documents that Education Management Corporation produced to it in a federal whistleblower lawsuit.

On July 9, 2018, the Court ordered DOJ to produce approximately 3,600 pages of documents to the Project—documents that the government had asserted that the public had no right to. Over seven months later, DOJ still has not fully complied with the Court’s order. DOJ initially produced approximately 1,800 pages to our office, refusing to produce the remaining pages. As requested by the Project, the Court again instructed DOJ to produce the remaining 1,800 pages. DOJ then produced the outstanding pages, but many of them were either heavily or completely redacted. After the Project questioned the appropriateness of the redactions, the government determined that it would remove some of the redactions and would reproduce the documents to the Project. Though DOJ has reproduced some of the documents in question, the Project is still waiting for all documents that it is lawfully entitled to.

Related Litigation
DOJ provided conflicting reasons for why it originally withheld documents from the Project. Initially, it cited four FOIA exemptions and protective orders in the whistleblower litigation as the basis for denying the Project’s FOIA request. Later, the government asserted that the requested documents were not agency records and indicated that it had not even searched for or reviewed potentially responsive documents. Consequently, in March 2018, the Project filed a separate FOIA request to DOJ for all records related to its original FOIA request and the administrative appeal of that original request. On December 7, 2018, the Project filed a second FOIA lawsuit against DOJ challenging its failure to respond to this second FOIA request. Despite its complete failure to respond to the Project’s second FOIA request and consistent with its previous recalcitrance to comply with legitimate FOIA requests, DOJ filed its answer in which it denies that the Project is entitled to any documents.

Related Documents
The Court’s Order of July 9, 2018
The Project’s Second FOIA Complaint

Higher Education is Failing Students of Color, but Congress Can Help

The harsh reality is that the burdens of student debt are not shared equally. Students of color borrow more on average than other students seeking the same degree, and are two to three times more likely to default than their white counterparts. Furthermore, because they borrow more, students of color are disproportionately impacted by the negative effects of poor student loan servicing, which contribute to the racial wealth gap.

Beyond the financial barriers to equity in higher education, more generally, students of color are less likely to graduate with degrees than their white peers and are more likely to be pushed out of their schools due to safety concerns. These systemic problems require policymakers to come to the table to drive real change.

Fortunately, select leaders in Congress are acknowledging the issue and are researching ways to address it. Earlier this year, Senators Doug Jones, Elizabeth Warren, Kamala Harris, and Catherine Cortez Masto asked the Project on Predatory Student Lending and other experts to recommend legislative changes to address racial disparities in student debt, as well as the various challenges students of color face in college and career training programs. In partnership with the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law, Mississippi Center for Justice, North Carolina Justice Center, and Southern Poverty Law Center, we recommended five areas where focused reforms could decrease racial inequality in higher education: (1) more oversight and accountability of for-profit colleges; (2) more data collection and transparency; (3) better oversight and management of loan servicers; (4) eliminate several specific barriers to student access and success; and (5) better protect student safety. Here is a brief summary of our recommendations.

 

1. Oversight and Accountability of For-Profit Colleges

For-profit colleges play an outsized role in generating and perpetuating disparate outcomes for students of color. People of color are significantly overrepresented in the for-profit college student population: although they account for less than one third of all college students, Black and Latino students represent nearly half of the students enrolled in proprietary colleges. In order to attract and enroll these students many for-profit colleges engage in unfair and deceptive practices, including deceptive advertisements and unrelenting recruiting, and leave students without the education and career development support they were promised. In order to combat these predatory for-profit colleges and protect students of color, we proposed:

  • Codification of robust borrower defense protections
  • Regulating spending on marketing and recruiting
  • Strengthen the 90/10 rule
  • Bolster the federal role in the regulatory triad

 

2. Data Collection and Transparency

The Department of Education’s current data on federal financial aid is limited. In order to make fully informed legislative decisions, more comprehensive data collection and rigorous analysis are necessary. We proposed:

  • Codification of a gainful employment standard
  • Study the student unit record ban to determine whether the department should track student loan defaults by race

 

3. Loan Servicing

Loan servicer misconduct comes in many forms, all of which harm borrowers. Student loan servicers commonly steer borrowers into payment plans that are cheaper for the servicer, and costly for the borrower. Additionally, vague communication, misapplied borrower payments, and other customer service misconduct cost borrowers dearly. Because Black students are more likely than other racial groups to borrow, and borrow more, for their education, the negative effects of poor student loan servicing are disproportionately damaging to student borrowers of color. To combat the harmful practices of loan servicers, we proposed:

  • Simplification of federal student loan repayment and increased access to repayment information
  • Statutory support for a Student Loan Borrowers’ Bill of Rights
  • More specific requirements for communications and customer service

 

4. Student Access and Success

Students of color face many barriers in accessing and succeeding in higher education. College degrees have become even more necessary over time to achieve upward mobility and live a healthy economic life in the United States, but students of color lag behind their white counterparts in achieving associate degrees or higher. To increase access for students of color, we proposed:

  • Removing the consideration of criminal background in the determination of eligibility for federal student aid
  • Expanding opportunities for DREAMers to pursue higher education, and allow undocumented students to access federal student aid
  • Increase resources and support to HBCUs, Tribal colleges and universities, Hispanic serving institutions, and Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander serving institutions

 

5. Student Safety and Rights

U.S. Department of Education data show that incidents of hate crimes on college campuses have been increasing over the years and target students of color. This type of crime pushes students of color out of school. To combat this problem, schools must proactively create safe spaces for students of color. To promote student safety, we proposed:

  • Require schools to prevent campus sexual violence, appropriately investigate and respond to instances of sexual violence, and support survivors
  • Require schools to protect students from hate crimes while ensuring First Amendment protections

 

To learn more about the Project on Predatory Student Lending’s work on racial justice, click here.

Argosy University Stipends

In January of this year, Dream Center Education Holdings—the parent company of Argosy and several other schools—entered into a federal receivership. A receivership occurs when a court appoints someone outside a company to control the company, because the company is in serious financial trouble.

When Dream Center Education Holdings entered receivership, it had not distributed the federal student aid stipends to students. It is not clear who has this money and why it has not been distributed to students. Yesterday, the Department notified Argosy University that it lost eligibility for federal student aid. That letter is here.

The Department of Education recently posted information related to its handling of the missing stipends here. The Department is asking students who have not received their stipend to contact Federal Student Aid.

If you have not received your federal student aid stipend, contact Federal Student Aid to explain that you have not received your stipend. Call 1-844-651-0077 between Monday and Friday, 8 a.m.–8 p.m. Eastern, or go online (StudentAid.gov/feedback).

What happens next? It’s not clear: different people are saying different things about how and when Argosy University will close, and what teach-out options will exist when the school closes. Students who are attending Argosy University when it closes or who withdraw shortly before it closes and who do not participate in a teach-out and do not transfer credits to a comparable program at another school can apply to have their federal student loans discharged. For more information about closed-school discharge and how to apply, see https://www.studentloanborrowerassistance.org/loan-cancellation/federal-cancellation/school-related/closed-school/.

Unfortunately, we don’t have any more information right now.

Ensuring Veterans Aren’t Left Behind

Steven Kerns, 2L at Harvard Law School

As a veteran, I came to Harvard Law School’s Safety Net Project within the Veteran’s Legal Clinic to help bridge the civilian- military divide. SNP offered me a chance to help civilians and veterans realize some part of the American dream.

The veterans’ clinic serves civilians and veterans alike, and the SNP provides civilians and veterans with guidance through the Social Security, SNAP, Medicaid, and poverty prevention processes. We serve a strong legal need: Nearly 70 percent of Social Security applicants have no legal representation.

As a student, the clinic offered me a pathway to maintain the momentum I’d built up establishing my litigation skills in my summer at the California Attorney General’s office. The SNP gives me full responsibility for my cases: preparing an evidentiary record, interviewing clients, writing a legal brief, delivering oral argument, direct questioning of clients, cross-examining experts, and if a case is denied, preparing for the appellate argument.

A veteran recently told me that our team had changed his life. He was fond of saying that if it weren’t for bad luck, he’d have no luck at all. He was falsely imprisoned, sexually assaulted as a child, and tragically self-aware of all of it.

Most painful was his nobility, his gentle demeanor, and his broken strength. He blamed no one. He accepted responsibility for more than just his actions—he accepted responsibility for the world. The military has a way of conditioning many of us not to seek help until it’s too late, to shoulder the blame for circumstances beyond our control— to grin and bear it. It’s our strength in war and, often, our undoing at home.

After combing through more than 500 pages of medical records and recruiting mental health experts to evaluate the long history of impairments and treatment, I put together a written argument that led the administrative law judge to make a decision on the record—telling us on the day of the hearing that he was approving the case for more than eight years of retroactive benefits. This highly unusual move happens only when the ALJ determines the case is clearly in the applicant’s favor and a hearing is no longer necessary.

Our client was spared having to dive deep into his trauma for the record. Realizing this, he was overcome with relief. And while we all shared a brief moment of joy, that veteran’s need is no less important than helping the civilians who walk through our doors. Our communities thrive together.

As President Eisenhower noted in his seminal Cross of Iron speech, “Every gun that is made, every warship launched, every rocket fired signifies in the final sense, a theft from those who hunger and are not fed, those who are cold and are not clothed. This world in arms is not spending money alone.”

I may not be able to change the status quo, but the SNP empowers me to help Americans left behind by perpetual war. Here, they’re not forgotten. Here, my mission is no different than it was in the Army: to serve the American people.

By: Steve Kerns, J.D. ’20

Excerpt from “Law Students Speak: Why I Do Public Interest Work

Via the American Bar Association for Law Students 

Mass. Attorney General Maura Healey to Keynote LSC 40th Anniversary on April 5th

Maura HealeyLSC is honored to announce that “The People’s Lawyer” — Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey — will be the keynote speaker at the 40th anniversary celebration for the WilmerHale Legal Services Center (LSC) of Harvard Law School on April 5.

The address by Attorney General Healey will cap a day of exciting events recognizing LSC’s 40 years of training thousands of law students and providing high quality, pro bono civil legal services to Greater Boston’s most vulnerable residents. The event will also celebrate the role WilmerHale played in establishing our current location in Jamaica Plain 25 years ago.

Attorney General Healey’s keynote will begin at approximately 5 pm in the Ames Courtroom on the Harvard Law School campus. Her speech will provide a powerful capstone to the day’s events, which will include awards for emerging public interest leaders and community partners and the premiere of a documentary about LSC’s unique history and mission. Earlier in the day, interactive discussion roundtables will take place at LSC in Jamaica Plain. These discussion roundtables will bring together trailblazing LSC alumni and colleagues in the fields of clinical education, anti-poverty work, and public service to explore the principles and strategies that should guide our efforts as legal educators and community advocates.

Space is limited for all these events, so we encourage you to sign up at www.lscharvard40th.org as soon as possible for what promises to be a terrific opportunity to engage around some of the most important issues facing the pro bono legal services community and legal education.

About Maura Healey

As chief lawyer and law enforcement officer of the Commonwealth, Attorney General Healey heads “the People’s Law Firm,” advocating for the residents of Massachusetts by protecting consumers, combating fraud and corruption, investigating and prosecuting crimes, and protecting the environment, workers, and civil rights.

Since becoming Attorney General in 2015, Healey has tackled some of the most pressing challenges facing Massachusetts, including the opioid epidemic, escalating health care costs, wage theft, and gun violence. She has focused on strengthening consumer protections and on improving our criminal justice system, and launched a first-of-its-kind Community Engagement Division to bring the attorney general’s work into neighborhoods and communities.

Healey has joined and led many cases brought by attorneys general from across the country to protect federal clean air, water, and climate rules, end family separation at the border, uphold reproductive freedom and civil rights for transgender individuals, support student loan borrowers, stop interference with the U.S. Census, and defend the Affordable Care Act.

Prior to her election, Healey headed the office’s Civil Rights Division. In that role, she was the architect of the state’s successful challenge to the federal Defense of Marriage Act. Later as a Bureau Chief, Healey took on the mortgage crisis, shutting down predatory lenders, forcing banks to modify thousands of home mortgages, and stopping hundreds of foreclosures in Massachusetts communities.

Healey, the oldest of five children and the first LGBT state attorney general in the U.S., is a graduate of Harvard College and Northeastern Law School. She was captain of the women’s basketball team at Harvard, played basketball professionally in Europe, and has been inducted into the New England Basketball Hall of Fame.

We are thrilled to host Attorney General Healey and to bring together the broader LSC family for this first-ever gathering. We hope to see you on April 5th! Please be sure to sign up soon at www.lscharvard40th.org.

Veterans Legal Clinic to Create Discharge Upgrade Practice Manual with Connecticut Veterans Legal Center

The Veterans Legal Clinic is partnering with Connecticut Veterans Legal Center to significantly advance the practice of discharge upgrade law by developing a comprehensive Discharge Upgrade Practice Manual for veteran advocates and an online, searchable database of published discharge upgrade decisions. This national initiative is funded by the Bob Woodruff Foundation. To learn more about the Manual, click here to read Connecticut Veterans Legal Center’s press release.

Margaret Kuzma of the Connecticut Veterans Legal Center and Betsy Gwin, Dana Montalto, and Dan Nagin of the Veterans Legal Clinic

Margaret Kuzma of the Connecticut Veterans Legal Center and Betsy Gwin, Dana Montalto, and Dan Nagin of the Veterans Legal Clinic

 

 

Legal Services Center to host 40th Anniversary Event on April 5, 2019

On April 5, 2019, the Legal Services Center of Harvard Law School will celebrate its 40th anniversary with its first-ever reunion for alumni, faculty, students and friends. Learn more and register at lscharvard40th.org.

This will be a day to look ahead as well as to celebrate our past. We will consider:

  • How the law can be used to create economic justice.
  • How law students can be more effectively trained to meet legal needs.
  • How innovative partnerships with community organizations, medical providers, the private bar and other groups can enable us to work together to improve the lives of our communities’ most vulnerable residents.

April 5 will be a day of exciting events recognizing LSC’s 40 years of training thousands of law students and providing high quality, pro bono civil legal services to Greater Boston’s most vulnerable residents. The day’s event will also celebrate the role WilmerHale played in establishing our current location in Jamaica Plain 25 years ago.

Our keynote will be at approximately 5 pm in the Ames Courtroom on the Harvard Law School campus. Our soon-to-be announced speaker will provide a powerful capstone to the day’s events, which will include awards for emerging public interest leaders and community partners and the premiere of a short documentary about LSC’s unique history and mission. Earlier in the day, interactive discussion roundtables will take place at LSC in Jamaica Plain. These discussions will bring together trailblazing LSC alumni and colleagues in the fields of clinical education, anti-poverty work, and public service to explore the principles and strategies that should guide our efforts as legal educators and community advocates.

We hope you will join us. Space is limited for all of these events, so I encourage you to sign up at lscharvard40th.org as soon as possible for what promises to be a terrific opportunity to engage around some of the most important issues facing the pro bono legal services community and legal education.

We look forward to seeing you all on April 5.